Re20 and D6 just were not my cup of tea although they can work. I cringe every time I read that someone is using a U-47fet on kick! So that's sort of a spoiler about what I think of this fabulous :-). Placeed 1/2 way in the shell, aimed up at the beater point, you almost immediately have a final kick drum sound with a touch of 1176 or 2500 compression. An example of where the style of the music fits perfect with the RE20: I found that my Neumann M147 is very cool on kick. Another vote for the 868. I took my RE-20 to the local GC a while back to compare … Pattern control is so consistent that the frequency response is nearly independent of angular location of the sound source, creating virtually no off-axis coloration, yet providing greatest possible rejection of unwanted sounds. Unlike the newer broadcast dynamics, the RE27N/D and RE320, the RE20 does use an output transformer. the m88 is a bit more versatile in my opinion, gets used on guitar, toms once in a while, snare, vocals it sorta like a bigger soudning SM57 or M201. E FWIW, I like both SM7s and M88s better than RE20 on kick, and they're both current production. The RE20 is a very flat response microphone, very directional and it has very good sounding off-axis response. The RE27 has an improved frequency response. Please let us know! Usually end up placing it so that the point where the grill of the mic meets the body is at the plane of the drum head. the 320 is voiced and has a filter to accomodate modern kick drum sounds. Fitting bass guitar tracks together with kick drums recorded with D112, Beta52, e602, D6 always requires some extreme eqing of the Bass guitar. I like the RE 20 to bad they are so damn heavy, I've been using an ATM 25 as of late with pretty good results. I got my studio start at a firm that specialized in radio jingles and in the room where the vocals were cut were a pair of U47fet microphones. D12 is a fine microphone outside the kick for extra low end capture. (By comparison, the HPF on most studio condensers operates at a lower range but more aggressively, -3 to -6dB/octave below 75-150Hz.). Love the RE-20 and made many records I loved with them, but once I got a Shure Beta52 I rarely find myself using anything else. U47FET maybe as FOK, but not often. A true cardioid microphone, the RE20 offers greatest rejection at 180° off axis — directly to the rear of the microphone. D6 was just too scooped and too 'modern' for me. I cringe every time I read that someone is using a U-47fet on kick! RE20 is not a favorite of mine for kick, like one said if you want that old funk sound go for it. RE20 is a different animal with a nice roll off feature and is primarily intended as a v/o mic although it shines in other applications as well. The PL series was simply a rebranding of selected RE-series models. I use an RE20 inside and put the 147 outside and blend.........I like it. And of course there is a huge amount of bad suckin kick drums around. Big fan of my PR40 as well. One of our most popular mic setups for drums was a single RE20 overhead, another RE20 on kick and an SM-57 on the snare. The RE20 is an industry-standard large-diaphragm dynamic microphone, used worldwide on applications ranging from broadcast/VO to kick drum. The RE20 is an industry-standard large-diaphragm dynamic microphone, used worldwide on applications ranging from broadcast/VO to kick drum. [Ken explains – in probably a few more paragraphs than necessary – the answer to the above question. I use the Shure Beta52 all the time and place it 5" from the front head for a even balance of 'slap' and well rounded low end. Just like the D112 the re20 can use a little eq to get more or less of what one needs. It was a glorious sound. So I just finished testing out the Electro-Voice RE20 Dynamic Microphone, another fabulous vocal mic that I've been wanting to get my hands on for a long time.